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Glen Affric Tartan: Experts recreate Scotland’s oldest tartan | UK News

Experts have recreated the oldest-known piece of tartan ever found, which was retrieved from a peat bog after being buried for centuries.

The tartan was discovered around 40 years ago in Glen Affric in the Highlands and underwent rigorous testing by the Scottish Tartans Authority last year to confirm it was the oldest surviving piece of tartan.

The Glen Affric Tartan dates from 1500-1600 AD and went on to be exhibited at the V&A Dundee.

Manufacturer The House of Edgar has now recreated the tartan under the guidance of historian Peter MacDonald for people to wear.

EMBARGOED TO 0001 MONDAY JANUARY 22..Undated handout photo issued by House of Edgar of Peter MacDonald, Head of Research & Collections, The Scottish Tartans Authority (left) and John McLeish, Chair, The Scottish Tartans Authority holding a piece of the original Glen Affric Tartan in front of  the newly recreated tartan.  Experts have recreated the oldest-known piece of tartan ever found, which was buried for centuries. The Glen Affric Tartan was discovered around 40 years ago in a peat bog and underwent rigorous testing by the Scottish Tartans Authority last year to confirm it was the oldest surviving piece of tartan. Manufacturer and distributor of tartan fabrics, the House of Edgar, recreated the tartan under the guidance of tartan historian Peter Macdonald to recreate the Glen Affric for people to wear. Issue date: Monday January 22, 2024. PA Photo. See PA story HERITAGE Tartan. Photo credit should read: Alan Richardson /House of Edgar/V&A/PA Wire ..NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder. .
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The Glen Affric Tartan dates from 1500-1600 AD and went on to be exhibited at the V&A Dundee

It features the colours that dye analysis of the original tartan had confirmed – this included the use of green, yellow and red, which would have come from woad or indigo to create the green along with other natural dyes.

EMBARGOED TO 0001 MONDAY JANUARY 22..Undated handout photo issued by House of Edgar of Emma Wilkinson, designer at House of Edgar with Peter E MacDonald, Head of Research & Collections at The Scottish Tartans Authority with a piece of the original Glen Affric Tartan laid on top of the newly recreated tartan.  Experts have recreated the oldest-known piece of tartan ever found, which was buried for centuries. The Glen Affric Tartan was discovered around 40 years ago in a peat bog and underwent rigorous testing by the Scottish Tartans Authority last year to confirm it was the oldest surviving piece of tartan. Manufacturer and distributor of tartan fabrics, the House of Edgar, recreated the tartan under the guidance of tartan historian Peter Macdonald to recreate the Glen Affric for people to wear. Issue date: Monday January 22, 2024. PA Photo. See PA story HERITAGE Tartan. Photo credit should read: Alan Richardson/House of Edgar/V&A/PA Wire ..NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder. .
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Emma Wilkinson, designer at The House of Edgar, and Peter MacDonald, head of research and collections at the Scottish Tartans Authority

Emma Wilkinson, designer at The House of Edgar who worked on the project, said: “I create new tartans every day but this project is truly special – a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to recreate a piece of history.

“Tartan is such an iconic piece of Scotland’s identity and it has been a true pleasure to see this fabric come back to life to be enjoyed for generations to come.”

Read more from Sky News:
King wears new tartan
Russell Crowe reveals Scottish ancestor was beheaded

Mr MacDonald, head of research and collections at the Scottish Tartans Authority, said it was a “privilege” to examine the original specimen.

He added: “It is quite special to see the tartan remade as it could have been 500 years ago.”

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